BUC front 2021

Worship Services

Sunday at 10.00am
Rev Malcolm Rawlings

The Service will be live streamed on YouTube.
Current COVID restrictions will limit the number of people who can attend Worship in the Church.
Holy Communion will be observed on first Sunday of each month.

To find our Worship videos go to our YouTube Channel . Click the YouTube button below.

 

New!  Wednesday Evening Worship at 7.30pm
Rev Malcolm Rawlings

A small group, informal style worship with music, prayer and informal discussion upon a biblical theme.

 

New!  Tuesday Morning Prayers & Quiet Reflection at 8.30am

The Brighton Uniting Church is open from 8.30am to 11am on Tuesday mornings
for you to come and sit quietly for prayer and reflection.

To view our new video worship services. Click the button below.

Ministers Message

Dear God,

Lord God, may we be grateful for our lot,
and compassionate toward all those who are
suffering every kind of distress at this
difficult time. May we hold back nothing, and
hasten to be the ministers of prayer and mercy,
like the disciples of Him who went about doing
good in times of need. 

Amen

Covid-19 restrictions

Church Council will continue to provides updates on future services and meetings via email, this web page and  BUC Facebook

We ask the congregation to work with our various teams during this difficult time and thank you for your patience and understanding.

Uniting Church SA Ministry Resources during the Coronavirus pandemic

Link to SA UC Synod for latest updates on Coronavirus

WELCOME

Welcome to Brighton Uniting Church

Our service times are Sunday 10.00am (traditional and contemporary music).
Communion is celebrated on the first Sunday of each month.

ACTIVITIES

0_3-&-2_1_Playgroup

Playgroup

Run in the children’s room from 10.00am to 11.30am on Fridays during the school term.

0_3_Kid's-Club

Kid’s Club

Program school aged children meet together for fun, games and craft and to share a meal.

0_3-&-2_3_Computer-group-attendees

Computer Access

Tuesdays from 12.30pm to 2.30pm during school terms.

GALLERY

CONNECT

Get in touch with us…

For general enquiries feel free to email us  secretary@brighton.ucasa.org.au . We will get back to you as soon as possible.

WE WOULD LOVE TO CONNECT WITH YOU

Contact Us

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Church Office

BUC front 2021

Brighton Uniting Church
Street Address: 443 Brighton Road, Brighton SA 5048

Minister of the Word
Rev Malcolm Rawlings
Mobile: 0423 740 154
Email: minister@brighton.ucasa.org.au

Church Office
Phone: 0423 740 154
Email: secretary@brighton.ucasa.org.au

Hire of the Church Halls
Phone: 0423 740 154

Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Saint Francis had all that his society had to offer, he was a rich, young, educated and privileged male. Yet he chose to leave all this behind and pursue a life of simple poverty in community with nature and those ignored by society. Francis preferred the simple, uncomplicated life of nature, he wasn’t impressed by all the trappings of wealth and education. He could have preached to the powerful and rich, instead he preached to the birds and said they listened better. Those who did listen to him were the ones already ignored by society, they were already open to the truth that many others had closed their minds to. Simplicity, vulnerability and integrity are great friends of a life that is meaningful, and enable us to be in connection with others freely and generously. The example of St Francis gives us courage to live beyond the expectations placed upon us by our culture and society. If we can see ourselves in relation to all creation, if we can recognise our place as part of the universal community of all living things together, then we can hear the wisdom around us. Our lives well lived will add grace to our environment as we participate with all things around us.
Let us listen to the birds and the breeze, notice the flowers and trees around us, be gracious to the people and animals we meet, and allow space for wisdom to teach us from all the sources around us.
Let us share the truth of our lives and be generous in love to all.
... See MoreSee Less

Saint Francis had all that his society had to offer, he was a rich, young, educated and privileged male. Yet he chose to leave all this behind and pursue a life of simple poverty in community with nature and those ignored by society. Francis preferred the simple, uncomplicated life of nature, he wasn’t impressed by all the trappings of wealth and education. He could have preached to the powerful and rich, instead he preached to the birds and said they listened better. Those who did listen to him were the ones already ignored by society, they were already open to the truth that many others had closed their minds to. Simplicity, vulnerability and integrity are great friends of a life that is meaningful, and enable us to be in connection with others freely and generously. The example of St Francis gives us courage to live beyond the expectations placed upon us by our culture and society. If we can see ourselves in relation to all creation, if we can recognise our place as part of the universal community of all living things together, then we can hear the wisdom around us. Our lives well lived will add grace to our environment as we participate with all things around us. 
Let us listen to the birds and the breeze, notice the flowers and trees around us, be gracious to the people and animals we meet, and allow space for wisdom to teach us from all the sources around us.
Let us share the truth of our lives and be generous in love to all.

All of creation gives glory to God, by being what it was created to be. Animals, trees, rocks, molecules, planets; everything begins and ends offering its existence to the great journey of life. However, creation differs from humanity in one particular way, everything else doesn’t seem to waste time on self-doubt. Creation exists and in so doing declares the glory to God. Humanity differentiates itself from everything else because of our self-awareness, conscious thought and opposable thumbs. We acknowledge our own flaws, failures and guilt. This can be a helpful process in developing perspective and humility, it also enables us to learn from our mistakes and seek to be better people. However, we can also become lost in our self-doubt and be unable to change through our indulgence of self-pity. We can become trapped in a cycle of seeking affirmation from others and damning ourselves for our failures.
Like creation we all have the opportunity to be ourselves, to be who we were made to be, recognising our strengths and weaknesses, and celebrating the uniqueness of the individual so that God can be praised.
Our lives give glory to God when we live to our best. We can be who we are, not in a competitive or comparative way, it is more about being the amazing person we are; exploring, creating, sharing and celebrating who we were created to be. This involves us living our lives fully, allowing ourselves to be open to opportunities and possibilities, embracing both joy and sadness in all its diversity.
Whatever gifts we have, whatever season of life we are in, let us be all that we can be. No more no less, let us celebrate the Creator of life by living as best we can.
Let us be true to ourselves and praise our God.
... See MoreSee Less

All of creation gives glory to God, by being what it was created to be. Animals, trees, rocks, molecules, planets; everything begins and ends offering its existence to the great journey of life. However, creation differs from humanity in one particular way, everything else doesn’t seem to waste time on self-doubt. Creation exists and in so doing declares the glory to God.  Humanity differentiates itself from everything else because of our self-awareness, conscious thought and opposable thumbs. We acknowledge our own flaws, failures and guilt.  This can be a helpful process in developing perspective and humility, it also enables us to learn from our mistakes and seek to be better people. However, we can also become lost in our self-doubt and be unable to change through our indulgence of self-pity.  We can become trapped in a cycle of seeking affirmation from others and damning ourselves for our failures. 
Like creation we all have the opportunity to be ourselves, to be who we were made to be, recognising our strengths and weaknesses, and celebrating the uniqueness of the individual so that God can be praised. 
Our lives give glory to God when we live to our best. We can be who we are, not in a competitive or comparative way, it is more about being the amazing person we are; exploring, creating, sharing and celebrating who we were created to be. This involves us living our lives fully, allowing ourselves to be open to opportunities and possibilities, embracing both joy and sadness in all its diversity. 
Whatever gifts we have, whatever season of life we are in, let us be all that we can be. No more no less, let us celebrate the Creator of life by living as best we can.
Let us be true to ourselves and praise our God.

On Sunday week September 25, we will be joining St Judes for worship at their church.
As this is our morning tea week, we are moving our morning tea to this coming week September 18.
Come and join us for a time of fellowship and catching up.
... See MoreSee Less

There are a couple of well-known stories about lost things. One is about a lost sheep, the other about a lost coin. Both of these stories are said to be from Jesus, and over the years we have lived in the truth that the shepherd and the woman in these stories speak of how God seeks out and finds us because of God’s great love. We have been comforted by the fact that God values each one of us and rejoices whenever anyone of us is found by love that is ever seeking.
Whilst we can acknowledge the truth of God bringing the lost sheep home, what if we considered that these stories have more than just one meaning. While we celebrate God’s love for us, let’s pause for a moment and place ourselves into the role of the shepherd seeking the lost sheep, or the woman in the house seeking her lost coin.
When we place ourselves in that central role, we can ask ourselves the question, do we notice is someone is missing from the community? Also, we could consider if we take the time and effort to take stock of what is happening around us?
Like the characters in these stories, our lives are busy and we have many concerns, yet these stories invite us to look deeper into what is going on around us. These stories challenge us to be aware of people around us, and to seek out those who easily disappear in our communities. The shy, the sad, the lonely ones in our communities, our families. Do we notice when they are not participating, do we seek them out and celebrate when they are reconnected to our group?
The seeking of the lost, the finding of what was missing is a celebration of God’s example that calls us to do likewise. May you follow God’s example today.
... See MoreSee Less

There are a couple of well-known stories about lost things. One is about a lost sheep, the other about a lost coin. Both of these stories are said to be from Jesus, and over the years we have lived in the truth that the shepherd and the woman in these stories speak of how God seeks out and finds us because of God’s great love. We have been comforted by the fact that God values each one of us and rejoices whenever anyone of us is found by love that is ever seeking.
Whilst we can acknowledge the truth of God bringing the lost sheep home, what if we considered that these stories have more than just one meaning. While we celebrate God’s love for us, let’s pause for a moment and place ourselves into the role of the shepherd seeking the lost sheep, or the woman in the house seeking her lost coin. 
When we place ourselves in that central role, we can ask ourselves the question, do we notice is someone is missing from the community? Also, we could consider if we take the time and effort to take stock of what is happening around us? 
Like the characters in these stories, our lives are busy and we have many concerns, yet these stories invite us to look deeper into what is going on around us. These stories challenge us to be aware of people around us, and to seek out those who easily disappear in our communities.  The shy, the sad, the lonely ones in our communities, our families.  Do we notice when they are not participating, do we seek them out and celebrate when they are reconnected to our group? 
The seeking of the lost, the finding of what was missing is a celebration of God’s example that calls us to do likewise. May you follow God’s example today.

Cyclamen I got from Brian last year has done well again. ... See MoreSee Less

Cyclamen I got from Brian last year has done well again.
Load more

facebook          vimeo          uc-church